Miter Saw Tips and Tricks

Want to make your sawing life easier? Well, you’re on the right page, partner! Know how to use your mitre saws with ease today!

Below are the tricks and tips you have to be aware of as a miter saw user.

Transport The Right Way

Saws are heavy and big, and because of this, they’re not easy to handle. Don’t worry, though; there’s a solution! You just have to carry them by the base! Miter saws don’t have handles, but that doesn’t mean you can’t transport them with ease. When you bring them via the base, it’ll put less strain on your back and also on the sides of your leg.

Stop Blocks? Why Not?!

miter-saw-stop-block

If you’re doing repeat cuts, it’s best to screw two pieces of wood blocks to your miter saw stand to make the job easier. Let the blocks function as a stop for repetitive cutting. Just bear in mind that you ought to fix the lower block back about a half inch so that when sawdust or wood chips pile up against it, the cutting length won’t be changed by the debris.

Sacrificial Fences

If you’re sawing small parts, you can keep them from flying across the room using a sacrificial fence. You could make use of a scrap board or build a two-piece fence as a backup to the small cutoffs. Remember to keep your miter saw down at the end of every cut and to wait patiently for the blade to come to a full stop.

Mark the Danger Areas

Makita-LS1016LWith a red marker, label the fence and bed zones of the saw to remind you where you shouldn’t put your hands. Draw lines at least 7 inches from the 10-inch blades and 8 inches from the 12-inch ones.

Never Cross Your Arms

Miter saws are usually designed for right-handed users. This means you’ll have to adjust if you’re a left-handed one. Whatever you do, never cross your arms while using a miter saw. You might think that it’s okay to use your left hand to saw the material on the right and use your right hand to hold the material down, but that’s a dangerous stunt.

Check the Plate

throat-plate-miter-saw

Inspect the throat plate before every use. It should be in line with the table to reduce tear-out and hold the thin block, avoid it from swaying while cutting. If it’s too low, adjust it by taking it out from the miter saw and wedging it. You can wedge it by putting a tape on the ledge under the throat plate. Remember that most throat plates are pre-set a little below the miter saw’s table.